Tag: Nathan Pease

Review: The Winter Wolf (Otherworld Theatre)

Shariba Rivers stars as the Winter Wolf in Otherworld Theatre's The Winter Wolf by Joseph Zettelmaier 1

  

   

The Winter Wolf
   
Written by Joseph Zettelmaier
Otherworld Theatre, 3914 N. Clark (map)
thru Jan 6  |  tix: $20 (suggested)  |  more info
       
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December 18, 2018 | 0 Comments More

Review: Rites and Sacrifices (Idle Muse Theatre)

Caty Gordon and Jean Waller in Idle Muse Theatre's "Rites and Sacrifices" by Jennifer L. Mickelson, directed by Evan Jackson.        
      
Rites and Sacrifices

Written by Jennifer L. Mickelson
Directed by Evan Jackson
at Collaboraction, 1579 N. Milwaukee (map)
thru March 23  |  tickets: $15-$20   |  more info
       
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February 24, 2014 | 1 Comment More

Review: The Three Musketeers (Lifeline Theatre)

Deanna Myers and Glenn Stanton in Three Musketeers at Lifeline Theatre        
       
The Three Musketeers 

Book by Alexandre Dumas
Adapted by Robert Kauzlaric
Directed by Amanda Delheimer Dimond
at Lifeline Theatre, 6912 N. Glenwood (map)
thru July 21  |  tickets: $40   |  more info
       
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June 11, 2013 | 0 Comments More

Review: Lonesome Hollow (Idle Muse Theatre)

Joel Thompson and Grace Abele star in Idle Muse Theatre's "Lonesome Hollow" by Lee Blessing, directed by Lenny Wahlberg. (photo credit: Lenny Wahlberg)        
       
Lonesome Hollow 

Written by Lee Blessing
Directed by Lenny Wahlberg 
at Side Project Theatre, 1439 W. Jarvis (map)
thru March 17  |  tickets: $15-$20   |  more info
       
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February 16, 2013 | 1 Comment More

Review: Corleone: The Shakespearean Godfather (Commedia Beauregard)

Rich Traub and Jovan King, Corleone, in Commedia Beauregard Theatre's "Corleone: The Shakespearean Godfather", written by David Mann, directed by Christopher O. Kidder. (photo credit: Jennifer Macias)        
       
Corleone:
  The Shakespearean Godfather

Written by David Mann  
Directed by Christopher O. Kidder 
at Greenhouse Theater, 2257 N. Lincoln (map)
thru July 8   |  tickets: $25   |  more info
       
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June 9, 2012 | 0 Comments More

Review: All Childish Things (Hubris Productions)

Nathan Petts as Max in Hubris Productions' "All Childish Things," written by Joseph Zellelmaier, directed by Dennis Frymire.      
     
All Childish Things 

Written by Joseph Zettelmaier 
Directed by Dennis Frymire
Greenhouse Theater Ctr, 2257 N. Lincoln (map)
thru Dec 17  |  tickets: $20-$25   |  more info

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November 20, 2011 | 0 Comments More

Review: The Lion in Winter (Idle Muse Theatre)

     
The Lion in winter - Idle Muse Theatre 2
The Lion in Winter
 

Written by James Goldman 
Directed by Evan Jackson
Side Project Theatre, 1439 W. Jarvis (map)
thru Sept 11  | tickets: $20  |  more info

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August 15, 2011 | 0 Comments More

Review: Eurydice (Filament Theatre Ensemble)

     
     

Beautifully poetic, yet occasionally off key

     
     

Carolyn Faye Kramer as Eurydice in Filament Theatre Ensemble's 'Eurydice' by Sarah Ruhl.

 

Filament Theatre Ensemble Presents

 
Eurydice
 
Written by Sarah Ruhl
Directed by Julie Ritchey
Original music by Peter Oyloe and Shannon Bengford
at the Lacuna Artist Lofts, 2150 S. Canalport (map)
thru May 29  |  tickets: $10-$35 sponsorship |  more info

Reviewed by Jason Rost

Sarah Ruhl’s work can be seen all over Chicago this year, from The Court’s Orlando—to The Goodman’s premiere of Stage Kiss opening in May. All the while, she is not only being staged in our big name venues, but also in the fringe with Filament Theatre Ensemble’s remount of her 2003 play, Eurydice (in conjunction with Orpheus: Featuring DJ Puzzle as Fate). And rest assured, the Pilsen space of the Lacuna Lofts is pure fringe with its unfinished, exposed and vacant expanse. It’s the type of building that’d be perfect for hide-n-seek, or the filming location for the next movie in the Hostel series. In this instance, director Julie Ritchey’s production, and Ruhl’s text, has something in common with the space, in that it is visually interesting, ignites curiosity, but in the end, it’s mostly empty.

If you’re unfamiliar with the Greek myth of Eurydice and Orpheus, you’ll not be out of the loop, as Ruhl extracts the more romantic and sentimental aspects, expounding on them in a contemporary fashion. The play opens with Orpheus (Peter Oyloe) and Eurydice (Carolyn Faye Kramer) in 1950’s swimsuits (costumed pitch-perfect by Mieka van der Ploeg). His love is so boundless that he offers her the world, literally, by giving her the sea, the sky and the stars. The only two thoughts ever on his mind are Eurydice and music, for Orpheus is the most talented musician in the world. After some lovely staging by Ritchey in the opening scene, Orpheus ties a string around Eurydice’s finger to which she responds amusingly, “That’s a very particular finger.” And so, the worry-free couple is to be wed.

Eurydice’s father (played with great heart by Patrick Blashill), is dead, yet he successfully manages to get a letter sent to Eurydice from the underworld. In a chain of events related to the letter, and ‘A Nasty Interesting Man’ (Nathan Pease), she takes a tumble to her death. And thus, she is transferred to the underworld, by way of a raining elevator version of the River Styx. Here we meet our chorus of three stones (played with dedicated physicality by Ted Evans, Brandon Cloyd and Ashley Alvarez), who unfortunately come off more annoying in their childishness than anything else.

The rest of the narrative plays out much the same as any version of the myth, as Orpheus gains entry to the underworld in search of Eurydice. However, in Ruhl’s imagining, there is a certain “through the rabbit hole” element to the underworld. Nothing is as it seems, everyday objects have lost their meaning, and it is a world void of emotion. Ruhl also takes her time to languish in stripping meaning from words like “father” and “love.” She writes a wonderfully lyrical monologue in a letter from Orpheus to Eurydice in which he ponders, “Eurydice is dead….who is Eurydice?…what are people?”

The direction and acting in Ritchey’s production is decidedly set in the two-dimensional, which in part works well with the Greek morality tradition. While it highlights Ruhl’s wit and verse, it sacrifices some of the heart and what’s at stake for each of these characters. Still, Carolyn Faye Kramer’s performance is smart and uninhibited. Nathan Pease’s turn as an “interesting” man is creepy yet intriguing, however as the Lord of the Underworld, Ritchey may have steered Pease’s character too far in the obvious direction with Ruhl’s childlike depiction. The doe-eyed Oyloe has wonderful focus with Orpheus’ unconditional loyalty to love and music. His naïve ambitions are committed to fully.

The overall mise-en-scène is starkly beautiful with the interplay between the cold industrial aesthetic of the space and the warm whimsical poetry in the costume, light and scenic design. Joe Schermoly uses minimal elements within the barren space, such as white tree branches, that are intriguing yet not fully transformative. The freight elevator serves as the perfect mode of transportation to the underworld. Sitting in silence, listening to the clanking of the approaching elevator—waiting—provides for a few of the more exhilarating moments of the night.

One fatal flaw in this production is the recorded music. Too often, it sounds more like the background music in an informational video for a time-share. The composition and design come off as unoriginal (I swear I heard the theme from Disney’s Beauty and the Beast quoted at one point on the piano), and falsely produced—the overly computerized MIDI sound to every note played on the strings takes away the possibility for any emotional response to the music or authenticity. It also underscores a bit loudly during key monologues and scenes. While this may seem a minor point, in a play that relies upon one of the main character’s abilities to create the most beautiful music in the world, it unfortunately takes the wind out of the sails of Orpheus’ journey. When Oyloe is alone on stage conducting a computerized orchestra, we do not believe he has tugged at the heart strings of any person or creature. Oyloe’s live acoustic guitar playing is far more effective than any of his and Shannon Bengford’s arrangements.

Ultimately, Filament may not have the resources to meet the necessities of Ruhl’s play. The lyricism of the dialogue can only sustain the story so far. The light playfulness of the text requires a higher level of theatricality and spectacle to maintain interest, and to achieve the intended emotional effect, and create a separation of the two worlds to flesh out Eurydice’s journey. The play wants to float along in a dream world in which anything can occur, time and language are rendered meaningless, and the desires of the characters are unbridled. In this fanciful, yet uneven production, I was woken up, and taken out of this dreamlike place a few too many times to consider the journey refreshing and worthwhile.

  
  
Rating: ★★½
  
  

Peter Oyloe as Orpheus and Carolyn Faye Kramer as Eurydice in Filament Theatre Ensemble's 'Eurydice' by Sarah Ruhl.

Sarah Ruhl’s Eurydice is directed by Filament’s Artistic Director, Julie Ritchey. It will run Friday through Sunday April 22 through May 29th in conjunction with Orpheus: Featuring DJ Puzzle as Fate. All performances are at 7:30pm. Tickets are a $10 – $35 sponsorship. Ticketing information is available at www.filamenttheatre.org/tickets.


April 28, 2011 | 0 Comments More